Problem of Practice

Do Your Homework!

homework-memeOne problem of practice that I face as a high school special education teacher is students not doing their homework.  I have a caseload of 17 students this year, some which I see in class and others I do not.  I am constantly printing out the names of their missing assignments and hounding them to get their assignments turned in.  Sometimes I meet with my students individually multiple times a week or remind them of assignments daily when I see them.  It is a lot to keep track of with my caseload and remembering which teachers have late policies or accept late work.  A couple students always tell me they turned them in, the teacher just hasn’t graded it yet.  This could be the case and I often double check with the teacher to be sure.  Missing assignments is a huge problem because for many of them turning in just one more may be the difference in them passing or failing the marking period.  Many of my students do not test well so getting their assignments turned in is important.

I co-teach Geometry and Algebra 1 classes and have a wide range of ability levels within my classes.  With our current online grading system students and parents may log in and view missing assignments.  This is effective for high achieving, conscientious students, or students with supportive families.  However, with many of my special education students that is not the case.  I email and call home to parents letting them know of the assignments, but without home support it is difficult to solve the problem.

This is a complex problem I face because there is no clear-cut solution that will work for every student.  I am looking forward to diving in and finding out the why of this problem in researching with my current students.  Through research, discussions with other teachers/districts, and programs or technologies that are designed to help with this issue, I hope that I can find an appropriate solution that I can implement to help my students.

Advertisements

One thought on “Problem of Practice

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s